Individual market enrollment: Updated view | McKinsey on Healthcare

All of the findings in this Intelligence Brief represent a view of the rapidly evolving individual insurance marketplace through February 13th. As such, enrollment trends may differ materially on March 31, 2014, the end of the open enrollment period. Six key observations emerged from our February survey findings:

  • Previously uninsured respondents accounted for 27 percent of February respondents who reported having selected a new 2014 product i.e., insured who switched and previously uninsured who enrolled, up from 11 percent in earlier surveys.
  • In total, 10 percent of all previously uninsured February respondents said that they had enrolled in a product, up from 3 percent in January.
  • More than three-quarters of those who reported having obtained coverage also said they had paid their premium out of all February respondents who said they had selected a new 2014 product, i.e., insured who switched or uninsured who enrolled. The payment rate was higher among the previously insured 86 percent than among the previously uninsured 53 percent.
  • A smaller proportion of the respondents who had not yet enrolled reported that they are likely to enroll, compared to prior surveyed months. However, most 65 percent of those who said that they intend to enroll continue to be the previously uninsured.
  • The most common reason for not enrolling cited by both previously insured and previously uninsured respondents continues to be perceived affordability challenges this was cited by ~50 percent of the respondents who had not yet enrolled.
  • Over 80 percent of the respondents who cited affordability as the reason for not enrolling are eligible for subsidies; 66 percent of these consumers were not aware of their subsidy eligibility status or subsidy amount.

via Individual market enrollment: Updated view | McKinsey on Healthcare.

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