Schimpff, MD: “Does direct primary care improve quality measures?” | The Direct Primary Care Journal

Patients in MDVIP practices studied have had a substantial drop in hospitalizations including a 79% decline for Medicare enrollees as compared to similar patients in regular primary care practices and a 72% reduction for those ages 35 to 64. Elective, non-elective, emergent, urgent, avoidable and unavoidable admissions to the hospital were all lower for the MDVIP members. Hospital readmissions have likewise declined substantially.Another retrospective review suggests that the MDVIP patients are more likely to have higher quality measures HEDIS than are those in regular primary care practices. For example, blood pressure control was better, diabetic HbA1c and cholesterol levels were lower and a higher percentage of patients had mammograms and colonoscopies, as appropriate for sex and age, than national averages.These are not randomized controlled studies but they do suggest that direct primary care with a reduced patient panel and extensive attention to wellness, prevention and care of those with complex chronic illnesses does result in better health and lower total costs to the system.

via Schimpff, MD: “Does direct primary care improve quality measures?” | The Direct Primary Care Journal.