Keynesian Economics and the Fallacy of Boosting Growth by Destroying Wealth | International Liberty

Yet Keynesian economics has “perplexing durability,” probably because the theory tells politicians that their vice of profligacy is actually a virtue.

Jeff Jacoby explains why this is poisonous economic analysis.

Could anything be more absurd? The shattering losses caused by hurricanes, earthquakes, forest fires, and other calamities are grievous misfortunes that obviously leave society poorer. Vast sums of money may be spent afterward to repair and rebuild, but society will still be poorer from the damage caused by the storm or other disaster. Every dollar spent on cleanup and reconstruction is a dollar that could have been spent to enlarge the nation’s reservoir of material assets. Instead, it has to be spent replacing what was lost. …No, hurricanes are not good for the economy. Neither are floods, earthquakes, or massacres. When windows are shattered, all of humanity is left materially worse off. There is no financial “glint of silver lining.” To claim otherwise is delusional.

Source: Keynesian Economics and the Fallacy of Boosting Growth by Destroying Wealth | International Liberty

Can the Government Run the Economy? – YouTube

“The economy isn’t a machine, and the government can’t force it to act like one”

Are You Sure You Want Medicare for All? – Reason.com

A big part of the problem, as Cato’s Tanner pointed out earlier this year is that “Americans want widely contradictory things from health-care reform. They want the highest-quality care for everyone, with no wait, from the doctor of their choice. And they want it as cheap as possible, preferably for free.” Promising, as Sanders and Warren do, to give everybody high-quality health care without regard for ability to pay will always find an enthusiastic audience. But delivering on that promise is likely to give us not the illusion of Medicare for All, but rather its awful, unsustainable reality.

Source: Are You Sure You Want Medicare for All? – Reason.com

Why Libertarians Should Want *More* Trust in Government – Reason.com

Lessons from the data: Those peoples that trust their government, tend to have more economic liberty, which generally keeps gov’t size and power in check.

Source: Why Libertarians Should Want *More* Trust in Government – Reason.com

“The State is the great fiction by which everyone endeavours to live at the expense of everyone else.”

government-great-fiction-bastiatOne of the best cases against the destructive uses of government was opined by Frederic Bastiat in the words below…
We all therefore, put in our claim, under some pretext or other, and apply to Government. We say to it, “I am dissatisfied at the proportion between my labor and my enjoyments. I should like, for the sake of restoring the desired equilibrium, to take a part of the possessions of others. But this would be dangerous. Could not you facilitate the thing for me? Could you not find me a good place? or check the industry of my competitors? or, perhaps, lend me gratuitously some capital which, you may take from its possessor? Could you not bring up my children at the public expense? or grant me some prizes? or secure me a competence when I have attained my fiftieth year? By this mean I shall gain my end with an easy conscience, for the law will have acted for me, and I shall have all the advantages of plunder, without its risk or its disgrace!” “

Repeal and Replace? No thanks. | Surgery Center of Oklahoma

Dr. Keith Smith

I’m all about repeal.  But let’s not stop with Obamacare.  Let’s move on to many disastrous legislative interventions brought to us from the other side of the aisle.  How about Medicare Part D, brought to us by a GOP-led executive?  Why didn’t the GOP change the tax code to end the discrimination against individual purchases of health insurance during the time they had all the power?  Hint:  see paragraph one of this blog.  This tax reform isn’t likely as the shift away from employer-purchased plans will gut the scam of PPO repricing, a devastating blow to the big insurance companies.

Source: Repeal and Replace? No thanks. | Surgery Center of Oklahoma