Health Care: You Are Not the Customer (David Goldhill) – YouTube

David Goldhill

Health “insurance” is NOT…INSURANCE. When everyone’s house is on fire at the same time we’re not talking about managing risk, we’re talking about a perpetually increasing spend.

Please listen to this insightful explanation by David Goldhill where he discusses this phenomenon and explains why Healthcare is not the economic Island that we made it out to be. Instead, much of what we believe and what we’ve done to healthcare, as far as economics and regulations, has made it an island unto itself. This is a huge part of the problem and one that has largely been self inflicted.

David Goldhill on Cost Drivers and Price Distortions in Healthcare

Minus the introduction and Q&A, the 45 -50 minute presentation is well worth your time. Engaging delivery and compelling case to consider… the cost drivers and distortions come from HOW we access and bill, as opposed to WHAT services are actually exchanged or provided. The key to understanding healthcare costs and pricing is to acknowledge that the answer is contained within our insurance card…and the processes it dictates and the tax/regulatory environment that it operates in. It is kind of like hiding something right out in the open; we look for clues everywhere except for what’s right in front of us. We tend to point fingers at easily identifiable components but fail to see what links them.

California’s Public Option Would Not Rescue Obamacare | Health Policy Blog | NCPA.org

The wheels are falling off Obamacare in California. UnitedHealth Care, the nation’s largest health insurer, only participated in the state’s exchange, Covered California, for one year before deciding to bail out. Participants are much older and sicker than the Administration or health insurers expected. So, premiums are spiraling up, beyond people’s ability to pay.

Covered California is already responsible for a significant taxpayer-funded cash flow. Currently, only a very small share is borne by the state. That will change if a public option relieves beneficiaries of their sky-high premiums. Last March (after the dust had settled on Obamacare’s third open season), Covered California had just under one million policies in force, covering almost 1.4 million enrollees. Total annual 2016 premiums would amount to $6.8 billion.

However, nine of ten enrollees pay significantly discounted premiums, because the insurers who write the policies receive significant tax credits to induce them to participate. Only $2.4 billion of the estimated total 2016 premium will have been paid by enrollees. Fully $4.4 billion will have been funded by federal taxpayers. So, if the public option eliminates enrollees’ responsibility to pay premium, state taxpayers would be on the hook for $2.4 billion.

But wait, there’s more! The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services estimatesthere are 313,000 Californians who are eligible for subsidized health insurance in Covered California, but chose to buy unsubsidized individual policies outside the exchange. It is not clear why they forgo the subsidies. Perhaps they want access to more doctors and hospitals than are available in Covered California’s infamously narrow networks. If they were freed from the responsibility of paying for any part of their premium in Covered California, surely many would get onboard.

If they are similar to the current enrollees, they would add almost half a billion dollars to the state taxpayers’ tab…

(A version of this Health Alert was published by the Orange County Register.) Dave Jones, California’s Insurance Commissioner, has lifted a page from Hillary

Source: California’s Public Option Would Not Rescue Obamacare | Health Policy Blog | NCPA.org

Great Moments in Healthcare Consolidation: The Hospital is Having a Sale! | Robert Nelson, MD | Pulse | LinkedIn

What does the price of gasoline and the price of a chest x-ray have in common? Not much really, except the price of both have gone up in the Atlanta area recently; but the former did so for expected reasons that are predicated on behavioral economics and the relationship of demand to price. The latter went up, well, because it could.

But the sticker shock that I’ve experience lately trying to find a price on a simple chest X-ray is not due to any shortages (either perceived or real) or any sudden increase in demand. Nor was it from a sudden increase in the cost of performing an X-ray or some phenomenal increase in quality that created a better image or less radiation exposure. Nope, none of the usual factors that go into predicting price behavior were at play.

Source: Great Moments in Healthcare Consolidation: The Hospital is Having a Sale! | Robert Nelson, MD | Pulse | LinkedIn

The Wedge of Health Freedom

THE WEDGE PRINCIPLES

  • Transparent, Affordable Pricing
  • Freedom to Choose
  • True Patient Privacy
  • No Government Reporting
  • No Outside Interference
  • Cash-Based Pricing
  • Protected Patient-Doctor Relationship
  • All Patients Welcome

WedgeThe Wedge of Health Freedom will put patients and doctors back together — and set them free. Obamacare, more than 132,000 pages of Medicare regulations and onerous contractual requirements fr…

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