Save Us From The Health Care Reformers: They’re The Problem, Not The Solution

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John C. Goodman

Dr. Goodman’s article is a fantastic foray into the dark history organized medicine, culminating with a brutally honest assessment of the cartel that resulted. He gives a great preview of the good stuff in Greg Scandlen’s new book, Myth Busters: Why Health Reform Always Goes Awry, summarizing the oft-repeated myths we hear about healthcare economics thrown around like dogma.

Source: Save Us From The Health Care Reformers: They’re The Problem, Not The Solution

Are You Sure You Want Medicare for All? – Reason.com

A big part of the problem, as Cato’s Tanner pointed out earlier this year is that “Americans want widely contradictory things from health-care reform. They want the highest-quality care for everyone, with no wait, from the doctor of their choice. And they want it as cheap as possible, preferably for free.” Promising, as Sanders and Warren do, to give everybody high-quality health care without regard for ability to pay will always find an enthusiastic audience. But delivering on that promise is likely to give us not the illusion of Medicare for All, but rather its awful, unsustainable reality.

Source: Are You Sure You Want Medicare for All? – Reason.com

Health Care: You Are Not the Customer (David Goldhill) – YouTube

David Goldhill

Health “insurance” is NOT…INSURANCE. When everyone’s house is on fire at the same time we’re not talking about managing risk, we’re talking about a perpetually increasing spend.

Please listen to this insightful explanation by David Goldhill where he discusses this phenomenon and explains why Healthcare is not the economic Island that we made it out to be. Instead, much of what we believe and what we’ve done to healthcare, as far as economics and regulations, has made it an island unto itself. This is a huge part of the problem and one that has largely been self inflicted.

Evidence for the Prescription of Low-Carb High-Fat Diets

“…available evidence from clinical and preclinical studies indicates that LCHF diets consistently improve all other markers of cardiovascular risk—lowering elevated blood glucose, insulin, triglyceride, ApoB and saturated fat (especially palmitoleic acid) concentrations, reducing small dense LDL particle numbers, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, blood pressure and body weight while increasing low HDL-cholesterol concentrations and reversing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This particular combination of favourable modifications to all these risk factors is a benefit unique to LCHF diets.”

Source: Evidence for the Prescription of Low-Carb High-Fat Diets

Stone-walling low-carb: DAA, APHA, and the Diet of Worms. | Richard David Feinman

“Our Gutenberg is, of course, the internet where technical and scientific writings, once the province of specialists, can now be viewed by many and where they can be discussed widely. Publishers of many journals try to maintain pay-walls in keeping with somebody’s observation that publishers’ function used to be to make new information available while now they work to make information unavailable.  (Many simultaneously cash in on open access which charges the authors outrageous fees). Whether the availability of scientific facts is out-weighted by proliferation of alternative facts is open to question but, on balance, we have a view, not only of the science, but of the inner workings of the health agencies that might otherwise be visible to only a few. And that’s how we have extensive access to the Fettke case and an associated Diet convened by the Australian Senate.

As reported by Marika Sboros, Fettke “cannot tell patients not to eat sugar. Why not? Because the country’s medical regulatory body, Australian Health Practitioners Regulatory Authority (AHPRA), says so….It has been investigating Fettke for more than two years now. That was after the first anonymous complaint from a DAA dietitian in 2014. Earlier this year,  AHPRA told Fettke to stop talking about nutrition until it had decided on a suitable sanction.” and — I’m not making this up — “informed Fettke that it was investigating him for ‘inappropriately reversing (a patient’s) type 2 diabetes…’”

Dr. Gary Fettke testified at an Australian Senate Inquiry on November 1. and just “by coincidence,” a few days later, the APHRA 2 1/2 year investigation came to an end and Fettke was told that he would be constrained from giving nutritional advice.  In the end, this did not sit well with the Senate which undertook further hearing interrogating Martin Fletcher, the CEO of APHRA.”

Our 2015 paper, Low-carbohydrate diets as the first approach in the treatment of diabetes. Review and evidence-base, summarized the clinical experience and the research results of the 26 authors. M…

Source: Stone-walling low-carb: DAA, APHA, and the Diet of Worms. | Richard David Feinman

David Goldhill on Cost Drivers and Price Distortions in Healthcare

Minus the introduction and Q&A, the 45 -50 minute presentation is well worth your time. Engaging delivery and compelling case to consider… the cost drivers and distortions come from HOW we access and bill, as opposed to WHAT services are actually exchanged or provided. The key to understanding healthcare costs and pricing is to acknowledge that the answer is contained within our insurance card…and the processes it dictates and the tax/regulatory environment that it operates in. It is kind of like hiding something right out in the open; we look for clues everywhere except for what’s right in front of us. We tend to point fingers at easily identifiable components but fail to see what links them.

Did PSA Testing Save Ben Stiller’s Life?

One of the best articles I’ve ever read that explains the judgment pitfalls and snares we fall prey to when debating “screening” tests and gives some perspective on evidence vs proof.

 

Radiologist Saurabh Jha on how the actor’s recent disclosure of his prostate cancer diagnosis has increased the public uncertainty about PSA screening, and why that’s a good thing.

Source: Did PSA Testing Save Ben Stiller’s Life?