Hard Truths about Health Care ‌ by Michael Tanner

Micheal Tanner

Michael Tanner

“Every health-care system in the world rations care in some way, either through bureaucratic fiat (Scandinavia, the U.K.), waiting lists (Canada), or price (that’s us). One can argue about which of these rationing mechanisms is fairest or most efficient, but let’s not pretend that it won’t occur.”

http://www.nationalreview.com/article/446439/health-care-basic-facts-and-hard-truths

Vince Coakley Radio Show 3-10-2017 Hour 2

vince coakley

 

Vince talks with Dr. Bob Nelson about the health care situation.

Source: Vince Coakley Radio Show 3-10-2017 Hour 2

Dr. Bob Nelson speaks to the Palmetto Panel about importance of Healthcare Freedom in our Republic

Georgia Chapter Free Market Medical Association spokesperson, Dr. Bob Nelson, had the honor of addressing the 3rd annual Citizens in Action, Palmetto Panel held at Clemson University on February 25th about healthcare freedom and the importance of liberating markets with price honesty in healthcare.


<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/205822572″>Palmetto Panel: Dr. Bob Nelson, Free Market Medical Association</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/user1416051″>Thomas Hanson</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

David Goldhill on Cost Drivers and Price Distortions in Healthcare

Minus the introduction and Q&A, the 45 -50 minute presentation is well worth your time. Engaging delivery and compelling case to consider… the cost drivers and distortions come from HOW we access and bill, as opposed to WHAT services are actually exchanged or provided. The key to understanding healthcare costs and pricing is to acknowledge that the answer is contained within our insurance card…and the processes it dictates and the tax/regulatory environment that it operates in. It is kind of like hiding something right out in the open; we look for clues everywhere except for what’s right in front of us. We tend to point fingers at easily identifiable components but fail to see what links them.

Bloomberg, Opinion: “Healthcare is a business, not a right.”

This piece by Megan McArdle is one of the best treatises I’ve read on the economic conundrums facing healthcare and the philosophical wars that rage on around it. Despite the altruistic disguises that insulate much of centrally controlled healthcare systems financed by other people’s money, the price tag is still a consideration; not to mention freedom of choice is largely absent in those top-down budgeted systems.

https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2016-08-23/health-care-is-a-business-not-a-right

The Direct Primary Care Journal

“The health of Americans should not be a profit center. Health care is a right. Full stop.” That comes from the Twitter feed of personal finance writer Helaine Olen. But it could have issued straight from the heart of any progressive in the land. Subjecting health care to the sordid whims of the marketplace strikes many people as simply immoral.

opinionAUGUST 23, 2016 – “The health of Americans should not be a profit center. Health care is a right. Full stop.”

That comes from the Twitter feed of personal finance writer Helaine Olen. But it could have issued straight from the heart of any progressive in the land.  Subjecting health care to the sordid whims of the marketplace strikes many people as simply immoral. Nor is this feeling confined to the left. Conservatives may be less enthusiastic about socialized medicine, but talk to one about the health care system…

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Have PPO Networks Perpetrated The Greatest Heist In American History?

One of the best pieces I’ve read that exposes the real cost drivers in healthcare. Many of us have been shouting from the rooftops that the “villains” we implicate are just symptoms of a more fundamental poison in that is embedded in our third-party billing system and the cartel-like system it has created. Thanks to Dave Chase for putting the pieces together so clearly. Given the realities exposed here, we can no longer implicate something that has been virtually wholly absent from the healthcare economy which could have prevented this generational theft: A free market. 

The Sovereign Patient

Dave Chase

Dave Chase – Forbes contributor

Mike Dendy: I hear the talking heads on business TV (like CNBC) talk about stagnation of incomes for the middle class. Wrong. The additional money is there every year, it’s just going into a pool to pay for healthcare instead of into the pockets of the employees in the form of salary increases.

Americans overpay for healthcare by at least 30% and likely 50% in aggregate. For all intents and purposes, every employer in America gives every covered member on their healthcare plan a blank check every year and says….consume all the healthcare you want, anywhere you want, anytime you want, and never be concerned with or ask the price because it’s all paid for. Deductibles and co-pays are irrelevant, especially to hospitals, because pricing is so high it becomes somewhat immaterial.

Trillions Have Been Redistributed from the American Workforce to the Healthcare Industry Creating An Economic Depression for the Middle Class The Washington Post and Vox have done excellent reporting that shows U.S. spends so much more than other countries for one simple reason — price. The good news is that some […]

Source: Have PPO Networks Perpetrated The Greatest Heist In American History?

EpiPen: A Case Study in what’s the Matter with Health Care | Health Policy Blog | NCPA.org

Its not what you might think. For those on both sides of the political argument on this, please read Devon Herrick’s article exposing some of the less well known reasons for the otherwise avoidable EpiPen fiasco, and why open markets and giving credit to consumers for having a brain could solve this; much the same way as making oral contraceptives OTC.

Americans throw away unused epinephrine auto-injectors worth more than $1 billion annually. Or maybe it would be more accurate to say that Americans waste more

Source: EpiPen: A Case Study in what’s the Matter with Health Care | Health Policy Blog | NCPA.org

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