The U.K.’s Government-Run Healthcare System Is Working Wonderfully…for Bureaucrats | International Liberty

Hundreds of NHS managers have amassed million-pound pension pots while presiding over the worst financial crisis in the history of the health service… As patients face crippling delays for treatment, A&E closures and overcrowded wards, bureaucrats have quietly been building up huge taxpayer-funded pensions. They will be handed tax-free six-figure lump sums on retirement, and annual payouts from the age of 60 of at least £55,000 – guaranteed for life.

Nearly 300 directors on NHS trust boards have accrued pension pots valued at £1million or more; At least 36 are sitting on pots in excess of £1.5million – with three topping a staggering £2 million; The NHS pays a staggering 14.3 per cent on top of employees’ salary towards their pension – almost five times the average of 3 per cent paid in the private sector…

Back in 2013, I got very upset when I learned that senior bureaucrats at the IRS awarded themselves big bonuses, notwithstanding the fact that the agency was deeply tarnished by scandal because of …

Source: The U.K.’s Government-Run Healthcare System Is Working Wonderfully…for Bureaucrats | International Liberty

Best Kept Secret In Washington DC: The Future Of Medicare – Forbes

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John C. Goodman

The fact that Medicare has been put on a sound financially footing – for the first time in its history – has never appeared in any official government announcement. Ditto for the fact that the disabled and the elderly may bear a heavy cost along the way.

These facts have not been in the headlines of any major newspaper. They have not been addressed in any news article. To my knowledge they have never been discussed in any opinion editorial. Even more surprising, they are repeatedly ignored by scholars and in scholarly reports at think tanks around the country (other than my own).

Eerie as it may seem, the entire country has been acting as though these incredible public policy changes have never occurred.

Here is a third thing l bet you don’t know. Although Republicans have criticized the “Obama cuts in Medicare spending” as threatening access to care for the elderly, the GOP alternative essentially does exactly the same thing.

What no one bothered to discuss was the much bigger budget story: an enormous reduction in future Medicare spending and its impact on the health and financial well-being of the 54 million people in Medicare.

Here is a bit more detail.

Source: Best Kept Secret In Washington DC: The Future Of Medicare – Forbes

Free The Patient – Forbes

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John C. Goodman

Who is likely to negotiate the lowest fee with a doctor, hospital or some other health care provider? The federal government? A large employer? An insurance company? Or, a patient spending her own money? Strange as it may seem, the answer is often the patient. One of the most persistent myths on […]

Canadians coming to the United States (and paying a cash price upfront) were paying almost half as much as US employers were paying and even less than the typical payment by Medicare. Think about that. These patients not only lacked a big bureaucracy to bargain on their behalf; they were foreigners.

The other factor is third party payment. After the deductibles and copayments are exhausted (which is almost immediately in the case of a knee replacement) the only payer is the third party. The incentive of the hospital is not to lower charges, but to raise them. In fact hospitals typically try to maximize against third-party payment formulas and they have sophisticated computer programs to help them do it.

An individual patient, paying with his own money and willing to travel to another city for care, is a different kind of buyer. If the hospital wants his patronage, it has strong incentives to compete on price.

This very large insurance company, representing tens of thousands of people and their very large employer (the state of California), achieved a remarkable reduction in costs by doing nothing more than sending patients into the hospital marketplace with the knowledge that the money they had to spend totaled no more than $30,000.

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Source: Free The Patient – Forbes

The One Thing… | Robert Nelson, MD | LinkedIn

I contend health plan networks and the multi-industry infrastructure that supports them, are simply a cartel propped up by unwise healthcare policy. They are definitely not part of a healthy functioning free-market.

Look carefully at the characteristics of how health plan networks operate and follow the money flow from start to finish. What holds it all together?  Despite its byzantine complexity and 40+ years of being entrenched into our national psyche, there is one linchpin that holds the whole perverse system together. Any guesses? What’s “The One Thing”?

 

Source: The One Thing… | Robert Nelson, MD | LinkedIn

The Solution to Making Our Healthcare System Affordable May Be a Lesson From Our Past | Jeffrey Gold | LinkedIn

Jeff Gold

Dr. Jeff Gold

For a state that prides itself on providing superior healthcare services for its citizens, Massachusetts is emerging as the state that no other state wants to emulate. No matter how much policymakers

Source: The Solution to Making Our Healthcare System Affordable May Be a Lesson From Our Past | Jeffrey Gold | LinkedIn

Is wellness working? | BenefitsPro

manwellnesssuitgetty-crop-600x338Indeed, the highest participation came for health risk and biometric assessments, which 48 percent of employees underwent. Organizations often offer employees lower premiums for doing such screenings.

Only 22 percent of workers participated in worksite diet or exercise events, while 8 percent took part in programs aimed at getting better sleep or quitting smoking.

The average employer offers $800 in incentives to employees for various wellness activities, but the average employee took in only $365, and 40 percent of employees earned nothing.

Source: Is wellness working? | BenefitsPro

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