Great Moments in Healthcare Consolidation: The Hospital is Having a Sale! | Robert Nelson, MD | Pulse | LinkedIn

What does the price of gasoline and the price of a chest x-ray have in common? Not much really, except the price of both have gone up in the Atlanta area recently; but the former did so for expected reasons that are predicated on behavioral economics and the relationship of demand to price. The latter went up, well, because it could.

But the sticker shock that I’ve experience lately trying to find a price on a simple chest X-ray is not due to any shortages (either perceived or real) or any sudden increase in demand. Nor was it from a sudden increase in the cost of performing an X-ray or some phenomenal increase in quality that created a better image or less radiation exposure. Nope, none of the usual factors that go into predicting price behavior were at play.

Source: Great Moments in Healthcare Consolidation: The Hospital is Having a Sale! | Robert Nelson, MD | Pulse | LinkedIn

The Wedge of Health Freedom

THE WEDGE PRINCIPLES

  • Transparent, Affordable Pricing
  • Freedom to Choose
  • True Patient Privacy
  • No Government Reporting
  • No Outside Interference
  • Cash-Based Pricing
  • Protected Patient-Doctor Relationship
  • All Patients Welcome

WedgeThe Wedge of Health Freedom will put patients and doctors back together — and set them free. Obamacare, more than 132,000 pages of Medicare regulations and onerous contractual requirements fr…

Source: About

We All Pay the Price, Because No One Knows the Price | Robert Nelson, MD | LinkedIn

downloadThe billing and payment system in healthcare is an economic joke and is indefensible. Given all that occurs in medical billing, it is impossible to make sense of pricing, thus the value proposition is incomprehensible.

Determining patient responsibility is not the same as knowing the price. Why should any payer (if they are paying the majority or all of the bill) pay more for strep throat in the ER than if treatment was rendered in a doctor’s office? It is precisely the low cost of entry to high cost venues for non-serious problems that allows this to happen, which is a direct result of the way we bill and pay for care.

In the ideal world, the advent of innovative payment models would arise out of the quest to find the “sweet spot”. That spot would seek to align incentives while balancing risk, maximizing efficiency, increase quality of service & outcomes and control costs. Our current system looks NOTHING like what I just described and it can never achieve those goals. So why do we put up with it?

Source: We All Pay the Price, Because No One Knows the Price | Robert Nelson, MD | LinkedIn